Building a Nice Cattery on a Shoestring

February 2015 by Bruce Walker, PhD and Bob Breeze

Audience: Executive Leadership, Public, Shelter/Rescue Staff & Volunteers

Video Length: 20 minutes

Desperate for cat adoption facilities but not enough funds to get a building?  Build out "habitats” in your local pet store or vet clinic!  Bruce Walker and Bob Breeze will tell you everything you need to know about securing locations, designing and building your own low-cost yet nice looking habitats.  They have now built several in the Austin area and these habitats are sturdy, easy to clean, and save lives! This program was part of the American Pets Alive! 2015 No-Kill Conference. 

About Dr. Bruce Walker

 Dr. Walker was born in a tiny town by parents who were country people at heart with a brother and sister. He married his high school sweetie and had a daughter straight out of high school, later deciding  to pursue further education. After finding a love for working with older students in congregations he led as a pastor, he fell into an admissions positions and four years later was associate director. He became dean of admissions and financial aid at University of Delaware where he worked prior to becoming Associate Vice President  of Student Affairs and Director of Admissions at the University of Texas in Austin. He recently retired and now actively volunteers at Austin Pets Alive!, sits on the Board of Directors for Match the Promise Foundation, and is very involved in Austin’s non-profit organizations.

His values are shaped by his history working in a saw mill, where he met a man who had worked there his entire life. He had no education, could not read, and was paid in credits redeemable only at the company store. He woke up and came to work every day without ever knowing the outside world. He had no ability to change his fate, as he did not have the necessary education to do anything else.

At that point Dr. Walker made a commitment to give voice to those who have no voice and power to those with none. Helping young people and focusing on diversity has had a profound effect on him. His compassion and commitment to the powerless also applies to the homeless companion animals in Austin. His volunteer work at APA! focuses on expanding operations and working with local businesses to host cat habitats in-store. 

About Bob Breeze

 Bob is a long-time resident of Austin who currently works as a consulting engineer for Zephyr Environmental Corporation here in town. When not doing that, he is liable to be working on one project or another for APA!. Prior to his current job, Bob was an environmental engineer and project manager working for Austin Energy for 22 years before he retired from the City of Austin. While at Austin Energy, Bob designed/managed quite a few projects at the various power plants and electrical substations all over Austin. Prior to that, he was a naval officer and was assigned to surface ships ranging from small to large. He even did a tour working with the Marines at Camp LeJeune before he left the navy. While in the navy, Bob had a chance to travel extensively and has traveled to over 25 countries. Bob has a Bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from University of Texas.

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