Instructions and Prognostic Info for Adopters of Mills and Hoarding

August 2012 by Franklin D. McMillan, DVM, DACVIM

Audience: Executive Leadership, Foster Caregivers, Public, Shelter/Rescue Staff & Volunteers, Veterinary Team

Video Length: 32 minutes

Animals adopted out after rescue from puppy mill and hoarding environments present adopters with a wide array of challenges. Fortunately, in recent years we have gathered a lot of information that can equip adopters with a better understanding of expectations, the likelihood of particular outcomes, the do's and don'ts of caring for these animals, the potential for the new pet's recovery and even the likelihood of an adopter's satisfaction. This 2012 Maddie's® Shelter Medicine Conference at the University of Florida talk, given by Franklin D. McMillan, DVM, DACVIM, Director of Well-Being Studies at Best Friend's Animal Society, will present a concise list of guidelines that can be provided to adopters of these very special animals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Acquire research-based counseling advice that can maximize the chances for successful adoption of rescued hoarded and puppy mill animals
  • Become best equipped to avoid adoping these special-need animals into the wrong household
  • Master the information to create a personalized shelter brochure to provide to adopters who are fortunate enough to adopt one of these little survivors

After viewing the presentation, click here to take the quiz and receive a Certificate of Attendance!

About Franklin D. McMillan, DVM, DACVIM

Dr. McMillan graduated from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State University in 1981, and following graduation he completed an internship and residency in small animal internal medicine at the University of California, Davis. Subsequently, Dr. McMillan was in private practice in Los Angeles for 23 years before becoming a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Western University of Health Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine. In 2007 he took a position at Best Friends Animal Society.

The focus of Dr. McMillan's studies is the mental health and emotional well-being of animals who have endured psychological trauma, such as abuse, hoarding, puppy mills, dogfighting and natural disasters. Dr. McMillan is the editor and co-author of the book, Mental Health and Well-Being in Animals.

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