Orphaned Kitten Survey Results

September 2013

Audience: Executive Leadership, Foster Caregivers, Public, Shelter/Rescue Staff & Volunteers, Veterinary Team

Orphaned kittens are the most fragile of homeless animals, and many shelters consider it too resource-intensive to care for them. For that reason, they often make up the largest single group of animals euthanized at many shelters.

In the spring of 2013, Maddie's InstituteSM conducted an online survey that asked administrators, staff members and volunteers of animal shelters and rescue groups in the United States to comment on their organization's approach to the care of orphaned kittens.

Our principle aim in conducting this study was to gather baseline data on several key areas concerning orphaned kitten care, including:

  1. Parameters of care and housing.
  2. Prevalence of health issues.
  3. Training given to individuals who provide care.
  4. Challenges organizations may face.

Click here to read a summary of key survey findings, featuring essential resource links.

Click here to read the comprehensive report, featuring respondent comments and suggestions from Maddie's Institute, as well as additional findings and resource links.

Orphaned Kitten Survey Map

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