Ringworm Roundup Two Outbreak Management

October 2013 by Sandra Newbury, DVM

Audience: Executive Leadership, Foster Caregivers, Shelter/Rescue Staff & Volunteers, Veterinary Team

Video Length: 77 minutes

In the second half of "Ringworm Roundup," Dr. Sandra Newbury, National Shelter Medicine Extension Veterinarian for the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program, discusses a step-by-step plan for managing any disease outbreak, but with a specific focus on ringworm. Learn how to stop the spread of disease and implement a proactive approach to keep ringworm from breaking out in your animal population again. This presentation is part of the University of Florida's Maddie's® Shelter Medicine Program track at the 2013 No More Homeless Pets National Conference.

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Dr. Sandra Newbury

Sandra Newbury, DVM

Dr. Newbury is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine with a special interest in infectious disease and population management as it relates to group health. Dr. Newbury joined the Koret Shelter Medicine Program at the University of California Davis in 2006. She also serves as the Chair of the Shelter Standards Task Force of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and as Adjunct Assistant Professor of Shelter Medicine in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Newbury has published several articles and book chapters relevant to shelter medicine. Her work has focused on infectious disease, immunology, and population medicine to improve understanding of shelter animal health, disease response and animal welfare. Dr. Newbury's focus in the last several years has been to open a discussion around the concept of capacity for care in the field of animal sheltering, examining means by which capacity needs could be estimated and adequate capacity could be better defined. Dr. Newbury travels throughout the year and has worked with shelters of all kinds across the U.S. and, more recently, in Canada and Australia. Dr. Newbury focuses on partnerships between shelters, veterinarians and the community to improve health, welfare and positive outcomes for homeless animals. Dr. Newbury and her son share their home in Madison with several minimally compliant and beloved pets.

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