Part 1: Safe and Efficient Anesthesia for High Quality, High Volume Spay Neuter

September 2016 by Emily McCobb, DVM, MS, DACVAA

Audience: Executive Leadership, Veterinary Team

Video Length: 81 minutes

This session reviews HQHV spay/neuter protocols in the context of the updated Association of Shelter Veterinarian guidelines. Discussion will be around monitoring, trouble shooting and avoiding common anesthesia complications. Dr. Emily McCobb offers her perspective as an anesthesiologist with spay/neuter experience. This presentation was recorded at the 2016 ASPCA Cornell Maddie's® Shelter Medicine conference at Cornell University.

About Dr. Emily McCobb

Dr. McCobb is Director of the Tufts Shelter Medicine Program.  She is also Director of the Luke and Lily Lerner Spay Neuter Clinic, Assistant Director of the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy and a clinical assistant professor of Anesthesia at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University.  Dr. McCobb mentors veterinary and graduate students for clinical work and for animal welfare related research projects.  Her published works cover the topics of shelter animal welfare and animal cruelty as well as clinical anesthesia and pain management. She is a board certified Veterinary Anesthesiologist and recently served on the Association of Shelter Veterinarians task force for the advancement of spay neuter which was tasked with revising the Spay Neuter Guidelines document.

 

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