RACE Continuing Education 

Maddie's InstituteSM is proud to offer continuing education for veterinary professionals through our RACE approved webcasts (live and on-demand).

The Registry of Approved Continuing Education (RACE) is one of the four key programs provided by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB). The purpose of the RACE program is to develop and apply uniform standards related to providers and programs of continuing education in veterinary medicine.

RACE-approved continuing veterinary education (CE) consists of educational activities that serve to maintain, develop or increase the knowledge, skills and professional performance and relationships that a veterinary professional uses to provide services for patients, the public or the profession.

Stopping Seborrhea in Dogs

May 2015

Seborrhea in dogs can be caused by underlying skin disease or by a primary skin defect. While not life-threatening, the odor and appearance can make it very difficult to find a home for even the friendliest, most appealing dog. What can shelters and foster homes do to resolve this condition in dogs they're caring for? Learn More

How to Stop Itching in Cats

February 2015

Itching is a major reason cats get taken to the veterinarian. While there's no one underlying cause of itching in cats, getting to the bottom of the condition is particularly important due to the overlap in symptoms between contagious and non-contagious infections that may cause itching. How can shelters and rescue groups, with their limited resources, diagnose, treat and prevent this skin disease? Learn More

How to Stop Itching in Dogs

February 2015

Itching is one of the number one reasons dogs visit veterinarians, and it plagues dogs in animal shelters and foster homes just as much. What can be done to give an affected dog some relief and get to the bottom of the underlying cause? Learn More

Introducing the Million Cat Challenge

January 2015

Every cat counts. That's the premise of the Million Cat Challenge, a joint campaign of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program and the Maddie's® Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida. Learn More

Behavior Modification for Cats

October 2014

Getting a leopard to change his spots sometimes seems easier than getting a domestic cat to change her behavior. Fortunately, the science of feline behavior modification has come a long way in recent years, leaving animal shelters, rescue groups, fosters and adopters with plenty of new tools to help cats become happier and well-adjusted companions. Learn More

Playing With Shelter Dogs

October 2014

Dogs and games go together - never more than when they're shelter dogs! Play, particularly play with humans, can reduce stress and improve behavioral and physical wellness for dogs in animal shelters.  Learn More

Treating the Treatables: Medical Protocols and Foster Care

September 2014

Does your shelter or rescue group have medical protocols in place to care for your pets and for your fostered dogs and cats? Foster programs are critical if we want to help more pets who are facing treatable medical conditions, and to expand the capacity of a community to care for its homeless pets. Learn More

Treat and Prevent Heartworm in Dogs

August 2014

Heartworm disease is 100% preventable, yet experts estimate one million dogs in the U.S. are infected with the parasite. The challenge of prevention and treatment is particularly acute in animal shelters, which usually receive the dogs when they are already heartworm-positive and face challenges finding resources to treat them. Learn More

Treating and Preventing Parvo

July 2014

Few diseases strike as much fear in the heart of animal shelter personnel as canine parvovirus (CPV). Outbreaks can cause widespread death and suffering, and erode community goodwill the shelter depends on when seeking volunteers, adopters and donors. Learn More

Critical Care of the Sick Neonatal Kitten

March 2014

Neonatal kittens' lives are fragile under the best of circumstances, and that fragility increases when they are orphaned or sick. How can shelter veterinarians, and those working with kitten nursery programs or rescue groups, provide the best care for this population? Learn More

Canine Distemper

January 2014

Canine distemper outbreaks are a fact of life in animal shelters across the country, and a frequent cause of loss of life for infected and exposed dogs. Learn More

Helping Cats Who Hiss and Hide

November 2013

Can cats who are shy and fearful in the shelter still get adopted? Yes, says board certified veterinary behavior specialist Dr. Sheila D'Arpino. Feline behavior while in a shelter is not always a good representation of that same cat's behavior in less stressful surroundings. Proper housing, handling, and, if needed, behavior modification can turn that hissing and hiding cat into a beloved family pet. Learn More

Dollars and Sense of Sheltering

August 2013

Sheltering isn't just about good intentions. It's about planning and developing programs that have a good chance of keeping animals healthy and happy, as well as maximizing adoptions and lifesaving. Learn More

Community Cats, Part One

June 2013

Are common cat sheltering and animal control policies helping cats? Are they humane? Effective? Not according to Dr. Kate Hurley, Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program.  Learn More