March 2020 by Sarah Aguilar, Deputy Director, Pima County Animal Care Center (Arizona) and Adam Ricci, Chief of Field Operations, City of Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department

Audience: Executive Leadership, Shelter/Rescue Staff & Volunteers, Veterinary Team

Video Length: 34:32

Are you an open intake shelter trying to navigate intake? Have you tried managed intake? Looking for alternative solutions that save lives and don't compromise the shelter's role in your community? Two animal shelter leaders from sizeable cities present ideas to keep your intake practices focused on serving pets and people. Learn how to face and work through some of the toughest challenges and responsibilities open intake shelters face.

This presentation was recorded at the 2020 American Pets Alive conference.

About Sarah Aguilar

Prior to moving to Tucson, Sarah was a program coordinator at the municipal shelter in Ventura, CA, where she managed their first formal foster program which placed nearly 3,000 animals into foster homes annually and tripled the number of cats adopted through partner pet stores and offsite events. Her experience as the training general manger for a national restaurant chain, combined with degrees in business management and accounting, have enabled Sarah to bring a unique customer service and systemic, data driven approach, to leading a municipal shelter.


About Adam Ricci

Ricci started his animal welfare career at the Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland in Westbrook, Maine. While a member of their kennel staff, Ricci co-founded Southern Maine Pit Bulls, better known as SOME Pit!, a pit bull education and advocacy group. Ricci then worked as a part-time police officer and took on additional roles: Property and Evidence Manager, Evidence Technician, Animal Control Supervisor, York County Special Deputy and represented the department on the York County Crime Task Force and the Maine Gang Intel Task Force. Ricci was also an instructor for the State of Maine Animal Control certification training.